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America's Unhealthiest Packaged Snack Foods

America's Unhealthiest Packaged Snack Foods


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Walking down the “snacks” aisle of a supermarket can be an ordeal for someone who’s watching his or her diet. So many of these processed items, whether sweet or savory, contain staggering amounts of fat and calories and are loaded with unpronounceable ingredients like disodium guanylate and sodium acid pyrophosphate.

America's Unhealthiest Packaged Snack Foods (Slideshow)

Why, exactly, is America so hooked on junk food? Is it the sugar, the fat, the salt? Or maybe it’s the advertising and some sort of psychological addiction? Whatever the reason, we eat a lot of junk. Junk food comes in plenty of different varieties, and some contain more sugar, fat, and salt — more calories — than others.

While just about everything is okay to eat in moderation, most consumers don’t pay nearly enough attention to serving size and portion control. While a cookie or two won’t do much damage to your waistline, a package of 10 might max out your recommended allowance of fat for the entire day. Potato chips and tortilla chips are known for being high in fat, and packaged snack cakes and baked goods can contain a lot more of the bad stuff than you may realize.

We’ve broken down the junk food aisle into 10 categories, and in each category we’ve found the worst offenders in terms of fat, sugar, salt, and calories. The next time you find yourself in the junk food aisle, you might just think twice before grabbing that Chex Mix, or any of the other favorites that made our list.

Potato Chips

Thicker chips, like Ruffles, and any chips flavored with cheese or other dairy products are often the ones with the most fat and calories.

Ruffles Cheddar and Sour Cream (Serving size: 1 ounce, about 11 chips or 28 grams)
Fat: 10 grams
Calories: 160
Sodium: 180 milligrams

Pringles Xtra Screamin' Dill Pickle (Serving size: 1 ounce, about 16 chips or 28 grams)
Fat: 9 grams
Calories: 150
Sodium: 105 milligrams
Sugars: 1 gram

Tortilla Chips


While tortilla chips are lower in fat and calories than potato chips, they’re usually still fried and are certainly not healthy. Also, are you really going to stop eating after six chips?
Tostitos Hint of Lime (Serving size: 1 ounce, about 6 chips)
Fat: 7 grams
Calories: 150
Sodium: 125 milligrams

Doritos Toasted Corn Chips (Serving size: 1 ounce, about 13 chips or 28 grams)

Fat: 7 grams
Calories: 140
Sodium: 120 grams


80 percent of US packaged foods may contain dangerous chemicals

Six common food additives found in an estimated 8-out-of-10 products sold in American stores are banned outside of the US, the Mail claims, putting millions of Americans at risk of consuming chemicals considered too dangerous for humans in other countries.

Grocery shop items including best-selling soft-drinks and cereal sold in the US contain additives such as brominated vegetable oil, olestra and others that have been banned in the European Union and elsewhere.

The Daily Mail cites ‘Rich Food, Poor Food,' a recently published book by Jayson Calton and Mira Calton, as the source for their claim that the majority of American groceries contain the additives.

Among the common items containing the chemicals are Mountain Dew, Chex Mix and Hungry Man frozen dinners, which are made with additives outlawed overseas due to health risks. The Caltons say these products are filled with some of the six “Banned Bad Boys” that are used in America but absent in supermarkets overseas.

One of the most common 'Bad Boys' is different variations of food coloring, which actually is made from petroleum and is found in everyday items like soda, sports drinks, mac and cheese, cake, candy and several other common, American products,” reports the Daily Mail. One of the chemicals in that food coloring, they add, has been proven to cause various different cancers. Those artificial dyes have been outlawed in Norway, Finland, Austria, France and the United Kingdom

Another additive, brominated vegetable oil, has been banned in over 100 countries because it’s been linked to causing major organ damage, birth defects and hearing loss, among other side effects. Brominated vegetable oil, or BVO, is used in Mountain Dew, Gatorade, Powerade and Squirt — and around 10 percent of all drinks sold in the US.

A petition started earlier this year to get BVOs out of beverages sold in the US received over 206,000 signatures on the website Change.org.

BVO is banned other places in the world, so these companies already have a replacement for it,” the petition’s author, Sarah Kavanagh, told The New York Times. “I don’t see why they don’t just make the switch.”

Another additive, potassium bromate, is used in American bakeries to speed up the process of preparing wraps, rolls and other bread products. It’s derived from the same chemical as BVO, though, and has been tied to causing kidney damage and cancer. That’s why it’s been outlawed in Europe, Canada and China, but not in the US.

Also on the Calton’s list is azodicarbonamide, a chemical the Daily Mail notes is used to make things like bleach and rubber yoga mats.

Azodicarbonamide is “approved to be a bleaching agent in cereal flour” and is “permitted for direct addition to food for human consumption,” according to the Food and Drug Administration. Along with waxy preservatives called butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) used in bubble gums, though, the additive has been banned in parts of Europe for potential health risks.

Rounding out the authors’ 'Bad Boys' list are Synthetic growth hormones rBGH and rBST and the chemical arsenic. They’ve both been banned in the EU for a variety of reasons, and perhaps for good reason: the arsenic put in American poultry can kill a human being if consumed in a high enough dosage.


80 percent of US packaged foods may contain dangerous chemicals

Six common food additives found in an estimated 8-out-of-10 products sold in American stores are banned outside of the US, the Mail claims, putting millions of Americans at risk of consuming chemicals considered too dangerous for humans in other countries.

Grocery shop items including best-selling soft-drinks and cereal sold in the US contain additives such as brominated vegetable oil, olestra and others that have been banned in the European Union and elsewhere.

The Daily Mail cites ‘Rich Food, Poor Food,' a recently published book by Jayson Calton and Mira Calton, as the source for their claim that the majority of American groceries contain the additives.

Among the common items containing the chemicals are Mountain Dew, Chex Mix and Hungry Man frozen dinners, which are made with additives outlawed overseas due to health risks. The Caltons say these products are filled with some of the six “Banned Bad Boys” that are used in America but absent in supermarkets overseas.

One of the most common 'Bad Boys' is different variations of food coloring, which actually is made from petroleum and is found in everyday items like soda, sports drinks, mac and cheese, cake, candy and several other common, American products,” reports the Daily Mail. One of the chemicals in that food coloring, they add, has been proven to cause various different cancers. Those artificial dyes have been outlawed in Norway, Finland, Austria, France and the United Kingdom

Another additive, brominated vegetable oil, has been banned in over 100 countries because it’s been linked to causing major organ damage, birth defects and hearing loss, among other side effects. Brominated vegetable oil, or BVO, is used in Mountain Dew, Gatorade, Powerade and Squirt — and around 10 percent of all drinks sold in the US.

A petition started earlier this year to get BVOs out of beverages sold in the US received over 206,000 signatures on the website Change.org.

BVO is banned other places in the world, so these companies already have a replacement for it,” the petition’s author, Sarah Kavanagh, told The New York Times. “I don’t see why they don’t just make the switch.”

Another additive, potassium bromate, is used in American bakeries to speed up the process of preparing wraps, rolls and other bread products. It’s derived from the same chemical as BVO, though, and has been tied to causing kidney damage and cancer. That’s why it’s been outlawed in Europe, Canada and China, but not in the US.

Also on the Calton’s list is azodicarbonamide, a chemical the Daily Mail notes is used to make things like bleach and rubber yoga mats.

Azodicarbonamide is “approved to be a bleaching agent in cereal flour” and is “permitted for direct addition to food for human consumption,” according to the Food and Drug Administration. Along with waxy preservatives called butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) used in bubble gums, though, the additive has been banned in parts of Europe for potential health risks.

Rounding out the authors’ 'Bad Boys' list are Synthetic growth hormones rBGH and rBST and the chemical arsenic. They’ve both been banned in the EU for a variety of reasons, and perhaps for good reason: the arsenic put in American poultry can kill a human being if consumed in a high enough dosage.


80 percent of US packaged foods may contain dangerous chemicals

Six common food additives found in an estimated 8-out-of-10 products sold in American stores are banned outside of the US, the Mail claims, putting millions of Americans at risk of consuming chemicals considered too dangerous for humans in other countries.

Grocery shop items including best-selling soft-drinks and cereal sold in the US contain additives such as brominated vegetable oil, olestra and others that have been banned in the European Union and elsewhere.

The Daily Mail cites ‘Rich Food, Poor Food,' a recently published book by Jayson Calton and Mira Calton, as the source for their claim that the majority of American groceries contain the additives.

Among the common items containing the chemicals are Mountain Dew, Chex Mix and Hungry Man frozen dinners, which are made with additives outlawed overseas due to health risks. The Caltons say these products are filled with some of the six “Banned Bad Boys” that are used in America but absent in supermarkets overseas.

One of the most common 'Bad Boys' is different variations of food coloring, which actually is made from petroleum and is found in everyday items like soda, sports drinks, mac and cheese, cake, candy and several other common, American products,” reports the Daily Mail. One of the chemicals in that food coloring, they add, has been proven to cause various different cancers. Those artificial dyes have been outlawed in Norway, Finland, Austria, France and the United Kingdom

Another additive, brominated vegetable oil, has been banned in over 100 countries because it’s been linked to causing major organ damage, birth defects and hearing loss, among other side effects. Brominated vegetable oil, or BVO, is used in Mountain Dew, Gatorade, Powerade and Squirt — and around 10 percent of all drinks sold in the US.

A petition started earlier this year to get BVOs out of beverages sold in the US received over 206,000 signatures on the website Change.org.

BVO is banned other places in the world, so these companies already have a replacement for it,” the petition’s author, Sarah Kavanagh, told The New York Times. “I don’t see why they don’t just make the switch.”

Another additive, potassium bromate, is used in American bakeries to speed up the process of preparing wraps, rolls and other bread products. It’s derived from the same chemical as BVO, though, and has been tied to causing kidney damage and cancer. That’s why it’s been outlawed in Europe, Canada and China, but not in the US.

Also on the Calton’s list is azodicarbonamide, a chemical the Daily Mail notes is used to make things like bleach and rubber yoga mats.

Azodicarbonamide is “approved to be a bleaching agent in cereal flour” and is “permitted for direct addition to food for human consumption,” according to the Food and Drug Administration. Along with waxy preservatives called butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) used in bubble gums, though, the additive has been banned in parts of Europe for potential health risks.

Rounding out the authors’ 'Bad Boys' list are Synthetic growth hormones rBGH and rBST and the chemical arsenic. They’ve both been banned in the EU for a variety of reasons, and perhaps for good reason: the arsenic put in American poultry can kill a human being if consumed in a high enough dosage.


80 percent of US packaged foods may contain dangerous chemicals

Six common food additives found in an estimated 8-out-of-10 products sold in American stores are banned outside of the US, the Mail claims, putting millions of Americans at risk of consuming chemicals considered too dangerous for humans in other countries.

Grocery shop items including best-selling soft-drinks and cereal sold in the US contain additives such as brominated vegetable oil, olestra and others that have been banned in the European Union and elsewhere.

The Daily Mail cites ‘Rich Food, Poor Food,' a recently published book by Jayson Calton and Mira Calton, as the source for their claim that the majority of American groceries contain the additives.

Among the common items containing the chemicals are Mountain Dew, Chex Mix and Hungry Man frozen dinners, which are made with additives outlawed overseas due to health risks. The Caltons say these products are filled with some of the six “Banned Bad Boys” that are used in America but absent in supermarkets overseas.

One of the most common 'Bad Boys' is different variations of food coloring, which actually is made from petroleum and is found in everyday items like soda, sports drinks, mac and cheese, cake, candy and several other common, American products,” reports the Daily Mail. One of the chemicals in that food coloring, they add, has been proven to cause various different cancers. Those artificial dyes have been outlawed in Norway, Finland, Austria, France and the United Kingdom

Another additive, brominated vegetable oil, has been banned in over 100 countries because it’s been linked to causing major organ damage, birth defects and hearing loss, among other side effects. Brominated vegetable oil, or BVO, is used in Mountain Dew, Gatorade, Powerade and Squirt — and around 10 percent of all drinks sold in the US.

A petition started earlier this year to get BVOs out of beverages sold in the US received over 206,000 signatures on the website Change.org.

BVO is banned other places in the world, so these companies already have a replacement for it,” the petition’s author, Sarah Kavanagh, told The New York Times. “I don’t see why they don’t just make the switch.”

Another additive, potassium bromate, is used in American bakeries to speed up the process of preparing wraps, rolls and other bread products. It’s derived from the same chemical as BVO, though, and has been tied to causing kidney damage and cancer. That’s why it’s been outlawed in Europe, Canada and China, but not in the US.

Also on the Calton’s list is azodicarbonamide, a chemical the Daily Mail notes is used to make things like bleach and rubber yoga mats.

Azodicarbonamide is “approved to be a bleaching agent in cereal flour” and is “permitted for direct addition to food for human consumption,” according to the Food and Drug Administration. Along with waxy preservatives called butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) used in bubble gums, though, the additive has been banned in parts of Europe for potential health risks.

Rounding out the authors’ 'Bad Boys' list are Synthetic growth hormones rBGH and rBST and the chemical arsenic. They’ve both been banned in the EU for a variety of reasons, and perhaps for good reason: the arsenic put in American poultry can kill a human being if consumed in a high enough dosage.


80 percent of US packaged foods may contain dangerous chemicals

Six common food additives found in an estimated 8-out-of-10 products sold in American stores are banned outside of the US, the Mail claims, putting millions of Americans at risk of consuming chemicals considered too dangerous for humans in other countries.

Grocery shop items including best-selling soft-drinks and cereal sold in the US contain additives such as brominated vegetable oil, olestra and others that have been banned in the European Union and elsewhere.

The Daily Mail cites ‘Rich Food, Poor Food,' a recently published book by Jayson Calton and Mira Calton, as the source for their claim that the majority of American groceries contain the additives.

Among the common items containing the chemicals are Mountain Dew, Chex Mix and Hungry Man frozen dinners, which are made with additives outlawed overseas due to health risks. The Caltons say these products are filled with some of the six “Banned Bad Boys” that are used in America but absent in supermarkets overseas.

One of the most common 'Bad Boys' is different variations of food coloring, which actually is made from petroleum and is found in everyday items like soda, sports drinks, mac and cheese, cake, candy and several other common, American products,” reports the Daily Mail. One of the chemicals in that food coloring, they add, has been proven to cause various different cancers. Those artificial dyes have been outlawed in Norway, Finland, Austria, France and the United Kingdom

Another additive, brominated vegetable oil, has been banned in over 100 countries because it’s been linked to causing major organ damage, birth defects and hearing loss, among other side effects. Brominated vegetable oil, or BVO, is used in Mountain Dew, Gatorade, Powerade and Squirt — and around 10 percent of all drinks sold in the US.

A petition started earlier this year to get BVOs out of beverages sold in the US received over 206,000 signatures on the website Change.org.

BVO is banned other places in the world, so these companies already have a replacement for it,” the petition’s author, Sarah Kavanagh, told The New York Times. “I don’t see why they don’t just make the switch.”

Another additive, potassium bromate, is used in American bakeries to speed up the process of preparing wraps, rolls and other bread products. It’s derived from the same chemical as BVO, though, and has been tied to causing kidney damage and cancer. That’s why it’s been outlawed in Europe, Canada and China, but not in the US.

Also on the Calton’s list is azodicarbonamide, a chemical the Daily Mail notes is used to make things like bleach and rubber yoga mats.

Azodicarbonamide is “approved to be a bleaching agent in cereal flour” and is “permitted for direct addition to food for human consumption,” according to the Food and Drug Administration. Along with waxy preservatives called butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) used in bubble gums, though, the additive has been banned in parts of Europe for potential health risks.

Rounding out the authors’ 'Bad Boys' list are Synthetic growth hormones rBGH and rBST and the chemical arsenic. They’ve both been banned in the EU for a variety of reasons, and perhaps for good reason: the arsenic put in American poultry can kill a human being if consumed in a high enough dosage.


80 percent of US packaged foods may contain dangerous chemicals

Six common food additives found in an estimated 8-out-of-10 products sold in American stores are banned outside of the US, the Mail claims, putting millions of Americans at risk of consuming chemicals considered too dangerous for humans in other countries.

Grocery shop items including best-selling soft-drinks and cereal sold in the US contain additives such as brominated vegetable oil, olestra and others that have been banned in the European Union and elsewhere.

The Daily Mail cites ‘Rich Food, Poor Food,' a recently published book by Jayson Calton and Mira Calton, as the source for their claim that the majority of American groceries contain the additives.

Among the common items containing the chemicals are Mountain Dew, Chex Mix and Hungry Man frozen dinners, which are made with additives outlawed overseas due to health risks. The Caltons say these products are filled with some of the six “Banned Bad Boys” that are used in America but absent in supermarkets overseas.

One of the most common 'Bad Boys' is different variations of food coloring, which actually is made from petroleum and is found in everyday items like soda, sports drinks, mac and cheese, cake, candy and several other common, American products,” reports the Daily Mail. One of the chemicals in that food coloring, they add, has been proven to cause various different cancers. Those artificial dyes have been outlawed in Norway, Finland, Austria, France and the United Kingdom

Another additive, brominated vegetable oil, has been banned in over 100 countries because it’s been linked to causing major organ damage, birth defects and hearing loss, among other side effects. Brominated vegetable oil, or BVO, is used in Mountain Dew, Gatorade, Powerade and Squirt — and around 10 percent of all drinks sold in the US.

A petition started earlier this year to get BVOs out of beverages sold in the US received over 206,000 signatures on the website Change.org.

BVO is banned other places in the world, so these companies already have a replacement for it,” the petition’s author, Sarah Kavanagh, told The New York Times. “I don’t see why they don’t just make the switch.”

Another additive, potassium bromate, is used in American bakeries to speed up the process of preparing wraps, rolls and other bread products. It’s derived from the same chemical as BVO, though, and has been tied to causing kidney damage and cancer. That’s why it’s been outlawed in Europe, Canada and China, but not in the US.

Also on the Calton’s list is azodicarbonamide, a chemical the Daily Mail notes is used to make things like bleach and rubber yoga mats.

Azodicarbonamide is “approved to be a bleaching agent in cereal flour” and is “permitted for direct addition to food for human consumption,” according to the Food and Drug Administration. Along with waxy preservatives called butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) used in bubble gums, though, the additive has been banned in parts of Europe for potential health risks.

Rounding out the authors’ 'Bad Boys' list are Synthetic growth hormones rBGH and rBST and the chemical arsenic. They’ve both been banned in the EU for a variety of reasons, and perhaps for good reason: the arsenic put in American poultry can kill a human being if consumed in a high enough dosage.


80 percent of US packaged foods may contain dangerous chemicals

Six common food additives found in an estimated 8-out-of-10 products sold in American stores are banned outside of the US, the Mail claims, putting millions of Americans at risk of consuming chemicals considered too dangerous for humans in other countries.

Grocery shop items including best-selling soft-drinks and cereal sold in the US contain additives such as brominated vegetable oil, olestra and others that have been banned in the European Union and elsewhere.

The Daily Mail cites ‘Rich Food, Poor Food,' a recently published book by Jayson Calton and Mira Calton, as the source for their claim that the majority of American groceries contain the additives.

Among the common items containing the chemicals are Mountain Dew, Chex Mix and Hungry Man frozen dinners, which are made with additives outlawed overseas due to health risks. The Caltons say these products are filled with some of the six “Banned Bad Boys” that are used in America but absent in supermarkets overseas.

One of the most common 'Bad Boys' is different variations of food coloring, which actually is made from petroleum and is found in everyday items like soda, sports drinks, mac and cheese, cake, candy and several other common, American products,” reports the Daily Mail. One of the chemicals in that food coloring, they add, has been proven to cause various different cancers. Those artificial dyes have been outlawed in Norway, Finland, Austria, France and the United Kingdom

Another additive, brominated vegetable oil, has been banned in over 100 countries because it’s been linked to causing major organ damage, birth defects and hearing loss, among other side effects. Brominated vegetable oil, or BVO, is used in Mountain Dew, Gatorade, Powerade and Squirt — and around 10 percent of all drinks sold in the US.

A petition started earlier this year to get BVOs out of beverages sold in the US received over 206,000 signatures on the website Change.org.

BVO is banned other places in the world, so these companies already have a replacement for it,” the petition’s author, Sarah Kavanagh, told The New York Times. “I don’t see why they don’t just make the switch.”

Another additive, potassium bromate, is used in American bakeries to speed up the process of preparing wraps, rolls and other bread products. It’s derived from the same chemical as BVO, though, and has been tied to causing kidney damage and cancer. That’s why it’s been outlawed in Europe, Canada and China, but not in the US.

Also on the Calton’s list is azodicarbonamide, a chemical the Daily Mail notes is used to make things like bleach and rubber yoga mats.

Azodicarbonamide is “approved to be a bleaching agent in cereal flour” and is “permitted for direct addition to food for human consumption,” according to the Food and Drug Administration. Along with waxy preservatives called butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) used in bubble gums, though, the additive has been banned in parts of Europe for potential health risks.

Rounding out the authors’ 'Bad Boys' list are Synthetic growth hormones rBGH and rBST and the chemical arsenic. They’ve both been banned in the EU for a variety of reasons, and perhaps for good reason: the arsenic put in American poultry can kill a human being if consumed in a high enough dosage.


80 percent of US packaged foods may contain dangerous chemicals

Six common food additives found in an estimated 8-out-of-10 products sold in American stores are banned outside of the US, the Mail claims, putting millions of Americans at risk of consuming chemicals considered too dangerous for humans in other countries.

Grocery shop items including best-selling soft-drinks and cereal sold in the US contain additives such as brominated vegetable oil, olestra and others that have been banned in the European Union and elsewhere.

The Daily Mail cites ‘Rich Food, Poor Food,' a recently published book by Jayson Calton and Mira Calton, as the source for their claim that the majority of American groceries contain the additives.

Among the common items containing the chemicals are Mountain Dew, Chex Mix and Hungry Man frozen dinners, which are made with additives outlawed overseas due to health risks. The Caltons say these products are filled with some of the six “Banned Bad Boys” that are used in America but absent in supermarkets overseas.

One of the most common 'Bad Boys' is different variations of food coloring, which actually is made from petroleum and is found in everyday items like soda, sports drinks, mac and cheese, cake, candy and several other common, American products,” reports the Daily Mail. One of the chemicals in that food coloring, they add, has been proven to cause various different cancers. Those artificial dyes have been outlawed in Norway, Finland, Austria, France and the United Kingdom

Another additive, brominated vegetable oil, has been banned in over 100 countries because it’s been linked to causing major organ damage, birth defects and hearing loss, among other side effects. Brominated vegetable oil, or BVO, is used in Mountain Dew, Gatorade, Powerade and Squirt — and around 10 percent of all drinks sold in the US.

A petition started earlier this year to get BVOs out of beverages sold in the US received over 206,000 signatures on the website Change.org.

BVO is banned other places in the world, so these companies already have a replacement for it,” the petition’s author, Sarah Kavanagh, told The New York Times. “I don’t see why they don’t just make the switch.”

Another additive, potassium bromate, is used in American bakeries to speed up the process of preparing wraps, rolls and other bread products. It’s derived from the same chemical as BVO, though, and has been tied to causing kidney damage and cancer. That’s why it’s been outlawed in Europe, Canada and China, but not in the US.

Also on the Calton’s list is azodicarbonamide, a chemical the Daily Mail notes is used to make things like bleach and rubber yoga mats.

Azodicarbonamide is “approved to be a bleaching agent in cereal flour” and is “permitted for direct addition to food for human consumption,” according to the Food and Drug Administration. Along with waxy preservatives called butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) used in bubble gums, though, the additive has been banned in parts of Europe for potential health risks.

Rounding out the authors’ 'Bad Boys' list are Synthetic growth hormones rBGH and rBST and the chemical arsenic. They’ve both been banned in the EU for a variety of reasons, and perhaps for good reason: the arsenic put in American poultry can kill a human being if consumed in a high enough dosage.


80 percent of US packaged foods may contain dangerous chemicals

Six common food additives found in an estimated 8-out-of-10 products sold in American stores are banned outside of the US, the Mail claims, putting millions of Americans at risk of consuming chemicals considered too dangerous for humans in other countries.

Grocery shop items including best-selling soft-drinks and cereal sold in the US contain additives such as brominated vegetable oil, olestra and others that have been banned in the European Union and elsewhere.

The Daily Mail cites ‘Rich Food, Poor Food,' a recently published book by Jayson Calton and Mira Calton, as the source for their claim that the majority of American groceries contain the additives.

Among the common items containing the chemicals are Mountain Dew, Chex Mix and Hungry Man frozen dinners, which are made with additives outlawed overseas due to health risks. The Caltons say these products are filled with some of the six “Banned Bad Boys” that are used in America but absent in supermarkets overseas.

One of the most common 'Bad Boys' is different variations of food coloring, which actually is made from petroleum and is found in everyday items like soda, sports drinks, mac and cheese, cake, candy and several other common, American products,” reports the Daily Mail. One of the chemicals in that food coloring, they add, has been proven to cause various different cancers. Those artificial dyes have been outlawed in Norway, Finland, Austria, France and the United Kingdom

Another additive, brominated vegetable oil, has been banned in over 100 countries because it’s been linked to causing major organ damage, birth defects and hearing loss, among other side effects. Brominated vegetable oil, or BVO, is used in Mountain Dew, Gatorade, Powerade and Squirt — and around 10 percent of all drinks sold in the US.

A petition started earlier this year to get BVOs out of beverages sold in the US received over 206,000 signatures on the website Change.org.

BVO is banned other places in the world, so these companies already have a replacement for it,” the petition’s author, Sarah Kavanagh, told The New York Times. “I don’t see why they don’t just make the switch.”

Another additive, potassium bromate, is used in American bakeries to speed up the process of preparing wraps, rolls and other bread products. It’s derived from the same chemical as BVO, though, and has been tied to causing kidney damage and cancer. That’s why it’s been outlawed in Europe, Canada and China, but not in the US.

Also on the Calton’s list is azodicarbonamide, a chemical the Daily Mail notes is used to make things like bleach and rubber yoga mats.

Azodicarbonamide is “approved to be a bleaching agent in cereal flour” and is “permitted for direct addition to food for human consumption,” according to the Food and Drug Administration. Along with waxy preservatives called butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) used in bubble gums, though, the additive has been banned in parts of Europe for potential health risks.

Rounding out the authors’ 'Bad Boys' list are Synthetic growth hormones rBGH and rBST and the chemical arsenic. They’ve both been banned in the EU for a variety of reasons, and perhaps for good reason: the arsenic put in American poultry can kill a human being if consumed in a high enough dosage.


80 percent of US packaged foods may contain dangerous chemicals

Six common food additives found in an estimated 8-out-of-10 products sold in American stores are banned outside of the US, the Mail claims, putting millions of Americans at risk of consuming chemicals considered too dangerous for humans in other countries.

Grocery shop items including best-selling soft-drinks and cereal sold in the US contain additives such as brominated vegetable oil, olestra and others that have been banned in the European Union and elsewhere.

The Daily Mail cites ‘Rich Food, Poor Food,' a recently published book by Jayson Calton and Mira Calton, as the source for their claim that the majority of American groceries contain the additives.

Among the common items containing the chemicals are Mountain Dew, Chex Mix and Hungry Man frozen dinners, which are made with additives outlawed overseas due to health risks. The Caltons say these products are filled with some of the six “Banned Bad Boys” that are used in America but absent in supermarkets overseas.

One of the most common 'Bad Boys' is different variations of food coloring, which actually is made from petroleum and is found in everyday items like soda, sports drinks, mac and cheese, cake, candy and several other common, American products,” reports the Daily Mail. One of the chemicals in that food coloring, they add, has been proven to cause various different cancers. Those artificial dyes have been outlawed in Norway, Finland, Austria, France and the United Kingdom

Another additive, brominated vegetable oil, has been banned in over 100 countries because it’s been linked to causing major organ damage, birth defects and hearing loss, among other side effects. Brominated vegetable oil, or BVO, is used in Mountain Dew, Gatorade, Powerade and Squirt — and around 10 percent of all drinks sold in the US.

A petition started earlier this year to get BVOs out of beverages sold in the US received over 206,000 signatures on the website Change.org.

BVO is banned other places in the world, so these companies already have a replacement for it,” the petition’s author, Sarah Kavanagh, told The New York Times. “I don’t see why they don’t just make the switch.”

Another additive, potassium bromate, is used in American bakeries to speed up the process of preparing wraps, rolls and other bread products. It’s derived from the same chemical as BVO, though, and has been tied to causing kidney damage and cancer. That’s why it’s been outlawed in Europe, Canada and China, but not in the US.

Also on the Calton’s list is azodicarbonamide, a chemical the Daily Mail notes is used to make things like bleach and rubber yoga mats.

Azodicarbonamide is “approved to be a bleaching agent in cereal flour” and is “permitted for direct addition to food for human consumption,” according to the Food and Drug Administration. Along with waxy preservatives called butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) used in bubble gums, though, the additive has been banned in parts of Europe for potential health risks.

Rounding out the authors’ 'Bad Boys' list are Synthetic growth hormones rBGH and rBST and the chemical arsenic. They’ve both been banned in the EU for a variety of reasons, and perhaps for good reason: the arsenic put in American poultry can kill a human being if consumed in a high enough dosage.



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