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Here’s How You Can Interact With Your Favorite Chefs on Twitter’s New Food Council

Here’s How You Can Interact With Your Favorite Chefs on Twitter’s New Food Council


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Twitter just announced its second significant project in the culinary world. Now this year, a team of chefs and food personalities led by chef Alex Guaranschelli have teamed up to create the #FoodFlock, a real-time Twitter community where chefs will post recipes and you can directly interact with your favorite stars.

I'm bringing together an amazing group of culinary titans. The first @TwitterFood Council- let's Tweet about food together using #FoodFlock!

— alex guarnaschelli (@guarnaschelli) July 21, 2016

“The Twitter Food Council includes top chefs and influencers representing different cuisines and interests,” according to the press release. “Anyone who wants to join the conversation and interact with Council members can simply Tweet with the official hashtag, #FoodFlock.”

Excited & inspired 2 be part of the first ever @TwitterFood council — tweet along w/ me by using #FoodFlock! pic.twitter.com/YZzZVKf1j7

— Giada De Laurentiis (@GDeLaurentiis) July 21, 2016

Twitter Food Flock is not all that different from how chefs normally use Twitter, where they regularly post food porn, recipes, and give out advice to fans:

[email protected] #askcarla pic.twitter.com/Jx3CIYPd30

— Carla Hall (@carlahall) May 2, 2016

But now all of that content will be located in one place organized under an umbrella hashtag.

Here’s the list of who’s participating so far:

Here are the inaugural members of the Twitter Food Council:

Adam Rapoport: @rapo4, editor in chief, Bon Appetit

Alex Guarnaschelli: @guarnaschelli, celebrity chef and head of Twitter Food Council

Amanda Hesser: @amandahesser, co-founder and CEO, Food52

Anne Burrell: @chefanneburrell, celebrity chef

Ayesha Curry: @ayeshacurry, celebrity chef

Carla Hall: @carlahall, celebrity chef

Curtis Stone: @CurtisStone, celebrity chef

Geoffrey Zakarian: @gzchef, celebrity chef

Giada De Laurentiis: @GDeLaurentiis, celebrity chef

Graham Elliot: @grahamelliot, celebrity chef

José Andrés: @chefjoseandres, celebrity chef

Marcus Samuelsson: @MarcusCooks, celebrity chef

Michael Mina: @ChefMichaelMina, celebrity chef

Ming Tsai: @chefmingtsai, celebrity chef

Michael Symon: @chefsymon, celebrity chef

Nilou Motamed: @niloumotamed, editor in chief, Food & Wine

Rick Bayless: @Rick_Bayless, celebrity chef


Social networking site connects home, professional chefs

If the faltering economy has you dining out less, your favorite restaurant dishes may be just a chop, mince and mix away.

A new social networking Web site for foodies lets home chefs interact with each other and professionals, swapping recipes and tips.

On the San Carlos-based Web site CookEatShare.com, users can do everything from sharing recipes with family members to finding out how to make the steak tacos from Town restaurant in San Carlos.

And anyone with a question about how to season the steak for those tacos can just message Town’s executive chef Jeremy Cheng &mdash or any of the other professional or home chefs with recipes on the site.

“It’s a space that we just didn’t see being met: social networking around home cooks,” said Mihir Shah, who founded the company with partner John Spottiswood, previously of Match.com.

Shah and Spottiswood worked together for years at Internet marketing firm QuinStreet and bonded over a shared love of food.

They launched CookEatShare in June, and the site currently gets about 500,000 unique users per month. It has 5,000 members, about a third of whom live in the Bay Area, said Shah, 39.

While professional chefs represent only about 10 percent of members, their recipes get the most views, he added.

“You can ask the chef about (the recipes),” Shah said. “It’s not like a cookbook.”

The site also gives professional chefs an opportunity to interact with fans and sometimes with students.

Linda Tay Esposito, a San Francisco-based chef who teaches cooking classes at Whole Foods Market in San Mateo and works for the company Parties that Cook, said she was at first hesitant to post her recipes because she dreamed of publishing a cookbook.

“You work very hard researching these recipes, testing them out &mdash I held back for many many years not showing them,” Tay Esposito said. But she decided to make the jump when the site launched and hasn’t looked back.

“It helps build branding and awareness,” she said.

The site hasn’t met with much resistance on that front because it’s the chef’s method &mdash not the ingredients&mdash that make the meal, Shah said.

Cheng, of Town, agreed adding that “part of the experience of dining out with us is the evening as a whole.”

“There are times when it’s cool for people to make our food at home,” he said.

Cheng said he mostly uses the site to keep up with the competition and look at other chef’s recipes.

Tay Esposito, meanwhile, has been communicating with students, many of whom appreciate being able to access recipes from her Southeast Asian cooking classes online, she said.

“I have my own Web site, but it’s kind of like one person’s effort versus a company’s effort,” Tay Esposito said with a laugh.

Shah and Spottiswood financed the site with their own money and plan to turn a profit by the end of 2009.

“We could make it profitable today,” Shah said.

“If we want to turn on the spigot, it’s very easy,” particularly with such a targeted audience for advertising, he added. But Shah worries that a sudden surge of ads could turn off users just as the site is catching on.

For now, the company will concentrate on increasing the number of members and expanding the site’s international users. It also plans to add new features in the coming months, such as better organization tools for recipe management, a new low-cost meals section and improved integration with sites like Facebook and MySpace.


Social networking site connects home, professional chefs

If the faltering economy has you dining out less, your favorite restaurant dishes may be just a chop, mince and mix away.

A new social networking Web site for foodies lets home chefs interact with each other and professionals, swapping recipes and tips.

On the San Carlos-based Web site CookEatShare.com, users can do everything from sharing recipes with family members to finding out how to make the steak tacos from Town restaurant in San Carlos.

And anyone with a question about how to season the steak for those tacos can just message Town’s executive chef Jeremy Cheng &mdash or any of the other professional or home chefs with recipes on the site.

“It’s a space that we just didn’t see being met: social networking around home cooks,” said Mihir Shah, who founded the company with partner John Spottiswood, previously of Match.com.

Shah and Spottiswood worked together for years at Internet marketing firm QuinStreet and bonded over a shared love of food.

They launched CookEatShare in June, and the site currently gets about 500,000 unique users per month. It has 5,000 members, about a third of whom live in the Bay Area, said Shah, 39.

While professional chefs represent only about 10 percent of members, their recipes get the most views, he added.

“You can ask the chef about (the recipes),” Shah said. “It’s not like a cookbook.”

The site also gives professional chefs an opportunity to interact with fans and sometimes with students.

Linda Tay Esposito, a San Francisco-based chef who teaches cooking classes at Whole Foods Market in San Mateo and works for the company Parties that Cook, said she was at first hesitant to post her recipes because she dreamed of publishing a cookbook.

“You work very hard researching these recipes, testing them out &mdash I held back for many many years not showing them,” Tay Esposito said. But she decided to make the jump when the site launched and hasn’t looked back.

“It helps build branding and awareness,” she said.

The site hasn’t met with much resistance on that front because it’s the chef’s method &mdash not the ingredients&mdash that make the meal, Shah said.

Cheng, of Town, agreed adding that “part of the experience of dining out with us is the evening as a whole.”

“There are times when it’s cool for people to make our food at home,” he said.

Cheng said he mostly uses the site to keep up with the competition and look at other chef’s recipes.

Tay Esposito, meanwhile, has been communicating with students, many of whom appreciate being able to access recipes from her Southeast Asian cooking classes online, she said.

“I have my own Web site, but it’s kind of like one person’s effort versus a company’s effort,” Tay Esposito said with a laugh.

Shah and Spottiswood financed the site with their own money and plan to turn a profit by the end of 2009.

“We could make it profitable today,” Shah said.

“If we want to turn on the spigot, it’s very easy,” particularly with such a targeted audience for advertising, he added. But Shah worries that a sudden surge of ads could turn off users just as the site is catching on.

For now, the company will concentrate on increasing the number of members and expanding the site’s international users. It also plans to add new features in the coming months, such as better organization tools for recipe management, a new low-cost meals section and improved integration with sites like Facebook and MySpace.


Social networking site connects home, professional chefs

If the faltering economy has you dining out less, your favorite restaurant dishes may be just a chop, mince and mix away.

A new social networking Web site for foodies lets home chefs interact with each other and professionals, swapping recipes and tips.

On the San Carlos-based Web site CookEatShare.com, users can do everything from sharing recipes with family members to finding out how to make the steak tacos from Town restaurant in San Carlos.

And anyone with a question about how to season the steak for those tacos can just message Town’s executive chef Jeremy Cheng &mdash or any of the other professional or home chefs with recipes on the site.

“It’s a space that we just didn’t see being met: social networking around home cooks,” said Mihir Shah, who founded the company with partner John Spottiswood, previously of Match.com.

Shah and Spottiswood worked together for years at Internet marketing firm QuinStreet and bonded over a shared love of food.

They launched CookEatShare in June, and the site currently gets about 500,000 unique users per month. It has 5,000 members, about a third of whom live in the Bay Area, said Shah, 39.

While professional chefs represent only about 10 percent of members, their recipes get the most views, he added.

“You can ask the chef about (the recipes),” Shah said. “It’s not like a cookbook.”

The site also gives professional chefs an opportunity to interact with fans and sometimes with students.

Linda Tay Esposito, a San Francisco-based chef who teaches cooking classes at Whole Foods Market in San Mateo and works for the company Parties that Cook, said she was at first hesitant to post her recipes because she dreamed of publishing a cookbook.

“You work very hard researching these recipes, testing them out &mdash I held back for many many years not showing them,” Tay Esposito said. But she decided to make the jump when the site launched and hasn’t looked back.

“It helps build branding and awareness,” she said.

The site hasn’t met with much resistance on that front because it’s the chef’s method &mdash not the ingredients&mdash that make the meal, Shah said.

Cheng, of Town, agreed adding that “part of the experience of dining out with us is the evening as a whole.”

“There are times when it’s cool for people to make our food at home,” he said.

Cheng said he mostly uses the site to keep up with the competition and look at other chef’s recipes.

Tay Esposito, meanwhile, has been communicating with students, many of whom appreciate being able to access recipes from her Southeast Asian cooking classes online, she said.

“I have my own Web site, but it’s kind of like one person’s effort versus a company’s effort,” Tay Esposito said with a laugh.

Shah and Spottiswood financed the site with their own money and plan to turn a profit by the end of 2009.

“We could make it profitable today,” Shah said.

“If we want to turn on the spigot, it’s very easy,” particularly with such a targeted audience for advertising, he added. But Shah worries that a sudden surge of ads could turn off users just as the site is catching on.

For now, the company will concentrate on increasing the number of members and expanding the site’s international users. It also plans to add new features in the coming months, such as better organization tools for recipe management, a new low-cost meals section and improved integration with sites like Facebook and MySpace.


Social networking site connects home, professional chefs

If the faltering economy has you dining out less, your favorite restaurant dishes may be just a chop, mince and mix away.

A new social networking Web site for foodies lets home chefs interact with each other and professionals, swapping recipes and tips.

On the San Carlos-based Web site CookEatShare.com, users can do everything from sharing recipes with family members to finding out how to make the steak tacos from Town restaurant in San Carlos.

And anyone with a question about how to season the steak for those tacos can just message Town’s executive chef Jeremy Cheng &mdash or any of the other professional or home chefs with recipes on the site.

“It’s a space that we just didn’t see being met: social networking around home cooks,” said Mihir Shah, who founded the company with partner John Spottiswood, previously of Match.com.

Shah and Spottiswood worked together for years at Internet marketing firm QuinStreet and bonded over a shared love of food.

They launched CookEatShare in June, and the site currently gets about 500,000 unique users per month. It has 5,000 members, about a third of whom live in the Bay Area, said Shah, 39.

While professional chefs represent only about 10 percent of members, their recipes get the most views, he added.

“You can ask the chef about (the recipes),” Shah said. “It’s not like a cookbook.”

The site also gives professional chefs an opportunity to interact with fans and sometimes with students.

Linda Tay Esposito, a San Francisco-based chef who teaches cooking classes at Whole Foods Market in San Mateo and works for the company Parties that Cook, said she was at first hesitant to post her recipes because she dreamed of publishing a cookbook.

“You work very hard researching these recipes, testing them out &mdash I held back for many many years not showing them,” Tay Esposito said. But she decided to make the jump when the site launched and hasn’t looked back.

“It helps build branding and awareness,” she said.

The site hasn’t met with much resistance on that front because it’s the chef’s method &mdash not the ingredients&mdash that make the meal, Shah said.

Cheng, of Town, agreed adding that “part of the experience of dining out with us is the evening as a whole.”

“There are times when it’s cool for people to make our food at home,” he said.

Cheng said he mostly uses the site to keep up with the competition and look at other chef’s recipes.

Tay Esposito, meanwhile, has been communicating with students, many of whom appreciate being able to access recipes from her Southeast Asian cooking classes online, she said.

“I have my own Web site, but it’s kind of like one person’s effort versus a company’s effort,” Tay Esposito said with a laugh.

Shah and Spottiswood financed the site with their own money and plan to turn a profit by the end of 2009.

“We could make it profitable today,” Shah said.

“If we want to turn on the spigot, it’s very easy,” particularly with such a targeted audience for advertising, he added. But Shah worries that a sudden surge of ads could turn off users just as the site is catching on.

For now, the company will concentrate on increasing the number of members and expanding the site’s international users. It also plans to add new features in the coming months, such as better organization tools for recipe management, a new low-cost meals section and improved integration with sites like Facebook and MySpace.


Social networking site connects home, professional chefs

If the faltering economy has you dining out less, your favorite restaurant dishes may be just a chop, mince and mix away.

A new social networking Web site for foodies lets home chefs interact with each other and professionals, swapping recipes and tips.

On the San Carlos-based Web site CookEatShare.com, users can do everything from sharing recipes with family members to finding out how to make the steak tacos from Town restaurant in San Carlos.

And anyone with a question about how to season the steak for those tacos can just message Town’s executive chef Jeremy Cheng &mdash or any of the other professional or home chefs with recipes on the site.

“It’s a space that we just didn’t see being met: social networking around home cooks,” said Mihir Shah, who founded the company with partner John Spottiswood, previously of Match.com.

Shah and Spottiswood worked together for years at Internet marketing firm QuinStreet and bonded over a shared love of food.

They launched CookEatShare in June, and the site currently gets about 500,000 unique users per month. It has 5,000 members, about a third of whom live in the Bay Area, said Shah, 39.

While professional chefs represent only about 10 percent of members, their recipes get the most views, he added.

“You can ask the chef about (the recipes),” Shah said. “It’s not like a cookbook.”

The site also gives professional chefs an opportunity to interact with fans and sometimes with students.

Linda Tay Esposito, a San Francisco-based chef who teaches cooking classes at Whole Foods Market in San Mateo and works for the company Parties that Cook, said she was at first hesitant to post her recipes because she dreamed of publishing a cookbook.

“You work very hard researching these recipes, testing them out &mdash I held back for many many years not showing them,” Tay Esposito said. But she decided to make the jump when the site launched and hasn’t looked back.

“It helps build branding and awareness,” she said.

The site hasn’t met with much resistance on that front because it’s the chef’s method &mdash not the ingredients&mdash that make the meal, Shah said.

Cheng, of Town, agreed adding that “part of the experience of dining out with us is the evening as a whole.”

“There are times when it’s cool for people to make our food at home,” he said.

Cheng said he mostly uses the site to keep up with the competition and look at other chef’s recipes.

Tay Esposito, meanwhile, has been communicating with students, many of whom appreciate being able to access recipes from her Southeast Asian cooking classes online, she said.

“I have my own Web site, but it’s kind of like one person’s effort versus a company’s effort,” Tay Esposito said with a laugh.

Shah and Spottiswood financed the site with their own money and plan to turn a profit by the end of 2009.

“We could make it profitable today,” Shah said.

“If we want to turn on the spigot, it’s very easy,” particularly with such a targeted audience for advertising, he added. But Shah worries that a sudden surge of ads could turn off users just as the site is catching on.

For now, the company will concentrate on increasing the number of members and expanding the site’s international users. It also plans to add new features in the coming months, such as better organization tools for recipe management, a new low-cost meals section and improved integration with sites like Facebook and MySpace.


Social networking site connects home, professional chefs

If the faltering economy has you dining out less, your favorite restaurant dishes may be just a chop, mince and mix away.

A new social networking Web site for foodies lets home chefs interact with each other and professionals, swapping recipes and tips.

On the San Carlos-based Web site CookEatShare.com, users can do everything from sharing recipes with family members to finding out how to make the steak tacos from Town restaurant in San Carlos.

And anyone with a question about how to season the steak for those tacos can just message Town’s executive chef Jeremy Cheng &mdash or any of the other professional or home chefs with recipes on the site.

“It’s a space that we just didn’t see being met: social networking around home cooks,” said Mihir Shah, who founded the company with partner John Spottiswood, previously of Match.com.

Shah and Spottiswood worked together for years at Internet marketing firm QuinStreet and bonded over a shared love of food.

They launched CookEatShare in June, and the site currently gets about 500,000 unique users per month. It has 5,000 members, about a third of whom live in the Bay Area, said Shah, 39.

While professional chefs represent only about 10 percent of members, their recipes get the most views, he added.

“You can ask the chef about (the recipes),” Shah said. “It’s not like a cookbook.”

The site also gives professional chefs an opportunity to interact with fans and sometimes with students.

Linda Tay Esposito, a San Francisco-based chef who teaches cooking classes at Whole Foods Market in San Mateo and works for the company Parties that Cook, said she was at first hesitant to post her recipes because she dreamed of publishing a cookbook.

“You work very hard researching these recipes, testing them out &mdash I held back for many many years not showing them,” Tay Esposito said. But she decided to make the jump when the site launched and hasn’t looked back.

“It helps build branding and awareness,” she said.

The site hasn’t met with much resistance on that front because it’s the chef’s method &mdash not the ingredients&mdash that make the meal, Shah said.

Cheng, of Town, agreed adding that “part of the experience of dining out with us is the evening as a whole.”

“There are times when it’s cool for people to make our food at home,” he said.

Cheng said he mostly uses the site to keep up with the competition and look at other chef’s recipes.

Tay Esposito, meanwhile, has been communicating with students, many of whom appreciate being able to access recipes from her Southeast Asian cooking classes online, she said.

“I have my own Web site, but it’s kind of like one person’s effort versus a company’s effort,” Tay Esposito said with a laugh.

Shah and Spottiswood financed the site with their own money and plan to turn a profit by the end of 2009.

“We could make it profitable today,” Shah said.

“If we want to turn on the spigot, it’s very easy,” particularly with such a targeted audience for advertising, he added. But Shah worries that a sudden surge of ads could turn off users just as the site is catching on.

For now, the company will concentrate on increasing the number of members and expanding the site’s international users. It also plans to add new features in the coming months, such as better organization tools for recipe management, a new low-cost meals section and improved integration with sites like Facebook and MySpace.


Social networking site connects home, professional chefs

If the faltering economy has you dining out less, your favorite restaurant dishes may be just a chop, mince and mix away.

A new social networking Web site for foodies lets home chefs interact with each other and professionals, swapping recipes and tips.

On the San Carlos-based Web site CookEatShare.com, users can do everything from sharing recipes with family members to finding out how to make the steak tacos from Town restaurant in San Carlos.

And anyone with a question about how to season the steak for those tacos can just message Town’s executive chef Jeremy Cheng &mdash or any of the other professional or home chefs with recipes on the site.

“It’s a space that we just didn’t see being met: social networking around home cooks,” said Mihir Shah, who founded the company with partner John Spottiswood, previously of Match.com.

Shah and Spottiswood worked together for years at Internet marketing firm QuinStreet and bonded over a shared love of food.

They launched CookEatShare in June, and the site currently gets about 500,000 unique users per month. It has 5,000 members, about a third of whom live in the Bay Area, said Shah, 39.

While professional chefs represent only about 10 percent of members, their recipes get the most views, he added.

“You can ask the chef about (the recipes),” Shah said. “It’s not like a cookbook.”

The site also gives professional chefs an opportunity to interact with fans and sometimes with students.

Linda Tay Esposito, a San Francisco-based chef who teaches cooking classes at Whole Foods Market in San Mateo and works for the company Parties that Cook, said she was at first hesitant to post her recipes because she dreamed of publishing a cookbook.

“You work very hard researching these recipes, testing them out &mdash I held back for many many years not showing them,” Tay Esposito said. But she decided to make the jump when the site launched and hasn’t looked back.

“It helps build branding and awareness,” she said.

The site hasn’t met with much resistance on that front because it’s the chef’s method &mdash not the ingredients&mdash that make the meal, Shah said.

Cheng, of Town, agreed adding that “part of the experience of dining out with us is the evening as a whole.”

“There are times when it’s cool for people to make our food at home,” he said.

Cheng said he mostly uses the site to keep up with the competition and look at other chef’s recipes.

Tay Esposito, meanwhile, has been communicating with students, many of whom appreciate being able to access recipes from her Southeast Asian cooking classes online, she said.

“I have my own Web site, but it’s kind of like one person’s effort versus a company’s effort,” Tay Esposito said with a laugh.

Shah and Spottiswood financed the site with their own money and plan to turn a profit by the end of 2009.

“We could make it profitable today,” Shah said.

“If we want to turn on the spigot, it’s very easy,” particularly with such a targeted audience for advertising, he added. But Shah worries that a sudden surge of ads could turn off users just as the site is catching on.

For now, the company will concentrate on increasing the number of members and expanding the site’s international users. It also plans to add new features in the coming months, such as better organization tools for recipe management, a new low-cost meals section and improved integration with sites like Facebook and MySpace.


Social networking site connects home, professional chefs

If the faltering economy has you dining out less, your favorite restaurant dishes may be just a chop, mince and mix away.

A new social networking Web site for foodies lets home chefs interact with each other and professionals, swapping recipes and tips.

On the San Carlos-based Web site CookEatShare.com, users can do everything from sharing recipes with family members to finding out how to make the steak tacos from Town restaurant in San Carlos.

And anyone with a question about how to season the steak for those tacos can just message Town’s executive chef Jeremy Cheng &mdash or any of the other professional or home chefs with recipes on the site.

“It’s a space that we just didn’t see being met: social networking around home cooks,” said Mihir Shah, who founded the company with partner John Spottiswood, previously of Match.com.

Shah and Spottiswood worked together for years at Internet marketing firm QuinStreet and bonded over a shared love of food.

They launched CookEatShare in June, and the site currently gets about 500,000 unique users per month. It has 5,000 members, about a third of whom live in the Bay Area, said Shah, 39.

While professional chefs represent only about 10 percent of members, their recipes get the most views, he added.

“You can ask the chef about (the recipes),” Shah said. “It’s not like a cookbook.”

The site also gives professional chefs an opportunity to interact with fans and sometimes with students.

Linda Tay Esposito, a San Francisco-based chef who teaches cooking classes at Whole Foods Market in San Mateo and works for the company Parties that Cook, said she was at first hesitant to post her recipes because she dreamed of publishing a cookbook.

“You work very hard researching these recipes, testing them out &mdash I held back for many many years not showing them,” Tay Esposito said. But she decided to make the jump when the site launched and hasn’t looked back.

“It helps build branding and awareness,” she said.

The site hasn’t met with much resistance on that front because it’s the chef’s method &mdash not the ingredients&mdash that make the meal, Shah said.

Cheng, of Town, agreed adding that “part of the experience of dining out with us is the evening as a whole.”

“There are times when it’s cool for people to make our food at home,” he said.

Cheng said he mostly uses the site to keep up with the competition and look at other chef’s recipes.

Tay Esposito, meanwhile, has been communicating with students, many of whom appreciate being able to access recipes from her Southeast Asian cooking classes online, she said.

“I have my own Web site, but it’s kind of like one person’s effort versus a company’s effort,” Tay Esposito said with a laugh.

Shah and Spottiswood financed the site with their own money and plan to turn a profit by the end of 2009.

“We could make it profitable today,” Shah said.

“If we want to turn on the spigot, it’s very easy,” particularly with such a targeted audience for advertising, he added. But Shah worries that a sudden surge of ads could turn off users just as the site is catching on.

For now, the company will concentrate on increasing the number of members and expanding the site’s international users. It also plans to add new features in the coming months, such as better organization tools for recipe management, a new low-cost meals section and improved integration with sites like Facebook and MySpace.


Social networking site connects home, professional chefs

If the faltering economy has you dining out less, your favorite restaurant dishes may be just a chop, mince and mix away.

A new social networking Web site for foodies lets home chefs interact with each other and professionals, swapping recipes and tips.

On the San Carlos-based Web site CookEatShare.com, users can do everything from sharing recipes with family members to finding out how to make the steak tacos from Town restaurant in San Carlos.

And anyone with a question about how to season the steak for those tacos can just message Town’s executive chef Jeremy Cheng &mdash or any of the other professional or home chefs with recipes on the site.

“It’s a space that we just didn’t see being met: social networking around home cooks,” said Mihir Shah, who founded the company with partner John Spottiswood, previously of Match.com.

Shah and Spottiswood worked together for years at Internet marketing firm QuinStreet and bonded over a shared love of food.

They launched CookEatShare in June, and the site currently gets about 500,000 unique users per month. It has 5,000 members, about a third of whom live in the Bay Area, said Shah, 39.

While professional chefs represent only about 10 percent of members, their recipes get the most views, he added.

“You can ask the chef about (the recipes),” Shah said. “It’s not like a cookbook.”

The site also gives professional chefs an opportunity to interact with fans and sometimes with students.

Linda Tay Esposito, a San Francisco-based chef who teaches cooking classes at Whole Foods Market in San Mateo and works for the company Parties that Cook, said she was at first hesitant to post her recipes because she dreamed of publishing a cookbook.

“You work very hard researching these recipes, testing them out &mdash I held back for many many years not showing them,” Tay Esposito said. But she decided to make the jump when the site launched and hasn’t looked back.

“It helps build branding and awareness,” she said.

The site hasn’t met with much resistance on that front because it’s the chef’s method &mdash not the ingredients&mdash that make the meal, Shah said.

Cheng, of Town, agreed adding that “part of the experience of dining out with us is the evening as a whole.”

“There are times when it’s cool for people to make our food at home,” he said.

Cheng said he mostly uses the site to keep up with the competition and look at other chef’s recipes.

Tay Esposito, meanwhile, has been communicating with students, many of whom appreciate being able to access recipes from her Southeast Asian cooking classes online, she said.

“I have my own Web site, but it’s kind of like one person’s effort versus a company’s effort,” Tay Esposito said with a laugh.

Shah and Spottiswood financed the site with their own money and plan to turn a profit by the end of 2009.

“We could make it profitable today,” Shah said.

“If we want to turn on the spigot, it’s very easy,” particularly with such a targeted audience for advertising, he added. But Shah worries that a sudden surge of ads could turn off users just as the site is catching on.

For now, the company will concentrate on increasing the number of members and expanding the site’s international users. It also plans to add new features in the coming months, such as better organization tools for recipe management, a new low-cost meals section and improved integration with sites like Facebook and MySpace.


Social networking site connects home, professional chefs

If the faltering economy has you dining out less, your favorite restaurant dishes may be just a chop, mince and mix away.

A new social networking Web site for foodies lets home chefs interact with each other and professionals, swapping recipes and tips.

On the San Carlos-based Web site CookEatShare.com, users can do everything from sharing recipes with family members to finding out how to make the steak tacos from Town restaurant in San Carlos.

And anyone with a question about how to season the steak for those tacos can just message Town’s executive chef Jeremy Cheng &mdash or any of the other professional or home chefs with recipes on the site.

“It’s a space that we just didn’t see being met: social networking around home cooks,” said Mihir Shah, who founded the company with partner John Spottiswood, previously of Match.com.

Shah and Spottiswood worked together for years at Internet marketing firm QuinStreet and bonded over a shared love of food.

They launched CookEatShare in June, and the site currently gets about 500,000 unique users per month. It has 5,000 members, about a third of whom live in the Bay Area, said Shah, 39.

While professional chefs represent only about 10 percent of members, their recipes get the most views, he added.

“You can ask the chef about (the recipes),” Shah said. “It’s not like a cookbook.”

The site also gives professional chefs an opportunity to interact with fans and sometimes with students.

Linda Tay Esposito, a San Francisco-based chef who teaches cooking classes at Whole Foods Market in San Mateo and works for the company Parties that Cook, said she was at first hesitant to post her recipes because she dreamed of publishing a cookbook.

“You work very hard researching these recipes, testing them out &mdash I held back for many many years not showing them,” Tay Esposito said. But she decided to make the jump when the site launched and hasn’t looked back.

“It helps build branding and awareness,” she said.

The site hasn’t met with much resistance on that front because it’s the chef’s method &mdash not the ingredients&mdash that make the meal, Shah said.

Cheng, of Town, agreed adding that “part of the experience of dining out with us is the evening as a whole.”

“There are times when it’s cool for people to make our food at home,” he said.

Cheng said he mostly uses the site to keep up with the competition and look at other chef’s recipes.

Tay Esposito, meanwhile, has been communicating with students, many of whom appreciate being able to access recipes from her Southeast Asian cooking classes online, she said.

“I have my own Web site, but it’s kind of like one person’s effort versus a company’s effort,” Tay Esposito said with a laugh.

Shah and Spottiswood financed the site with their own money and plan to turn a profit by the end of 2009.

“We could make it profitable today,” Shah said.

“If we want to turn on the spigot, it’s very easy,” particularly with such a targeted audience for advertising, he added. But Shah worries that a sudden surge of ads could turn off users just as the site is catching on.

For now, the company will concentrate on increasing the number of members and expanding the site’s international users. It also plans to add new features in the coming months, such as better organization tools for recipe management, a new low-cost meals section and improved integration with sites like Facebook and MySpace.



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