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Here’s Why Your Store-Bought Chicken Is Becoming Tough and Chewy

Here’s Why Your Store-Bought Chicken Is Becoming Tough and Chewy


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Factory farm-raised chicken is experiencing a condition known as ‘woody breast,’ rendering their meat tougher to chew

Chew on this! (With difficulty.)

Here’s another reason to double-check where you buy your meat. Factory farm-raised chickens, aside from being fed antibiotics, are now suffering another malady due to their condition: Woody breast syndrome.

Broiler chickens are raised to grow large quickly, and therefore the fibrous tissue in the meat has become tough or chewier thanks to this hasty process, according to the Wall Street Journal. In other words: Bigger chickens equal tougher meat.

Although this new breed of chicken problem isn’t exactly a health issue, it definitely helps explain why even perfectly-cooked chicken can sometimes be a little hard to swallow. “Woody breast” syndrome affects approximately five to 10 percent of poultry worldwide.

"The causes at this point are unknown, which is why the industry is spending more than a quarter of a million dollars on four separate research projects through the U.S. Poultry & Egg Association to have all of these questions answered," Tom Super, spokesman for the National Chicken Council, told CBS MoneyWatch.

This unappetizing trend could spell trouble for large chicken manufacturers like Tyson and Perdue if people stop buying their products as a result.


How To Butcher A Chicken

The first of many harvests took place this weekend, as it was time to send our beloved (or rather, tolerated) meat chickens to the freezer. It's never a day I look forward to – taking the life of an animal brings me no joy.

Well, scratch that. It does bring me joy in knowing that the Lord has provided these chickens for us and that He's made it possible for us to raise them, care for them, and end their lives as best as we can. But other than in the provision for our family, it's not the most fun task on the farm and (in my humble opinion) not one to be taken lightly.

To live and then die that others may live is sacrifice. These birds were sacrificed for our family and we are thankful for that.

There were too many to know by looks and none of our chickens are named so the kill process goes off without too much sorrow, though the sight is slightly grim. We use kill cones (plastic gallon containers that have been nailed to a tree, the bottom of the container cut off and the neck of the container cut larger to fit the head through) which makes the killing process much calmer and less dramatic, seeing as there are no headless chickens flopping around the barnyard. Instead, the chickens are gently placed into the cones where they stay quiet, their wings pinned to their sides. Once they are calm, we give thanks for the bird, and quickly slit the artery in the neck without cutting the windpipe. Essentially, the chicken bleeds out and quietly ‘falls asleep' while the heart continues to pump the blood from their body – it's very gentle (as gentle as killing can be).

The men folk in our family usually take on this task, as I prefer to complete the other stages of the process. Scalding. Plucking. And gutting.

Here's a quick play-by-play of the process on how to butcher a chicken.


How To Butcher A Chicken

The first of many harvests took place this weekend, as it was time to send our beloved (or rather, tolerated) meat chickens to the freezer. It's never a day I look forward to – taking the life of an animal brings me no joy.

Well, scratch that. It does bring me joy in knowing that the Lord has provided these chickens for us and that He's made it possible for us to raise them, care for them, and end their lives as best as we can. But other than in the provision for our family, it's not the most fun task on the farm and (in my humble opinion) not one to be taken lightly.

To live and then die that others may live is sacrifice. These birds were sacrificed for our family and we are thankful for that.

There were too many to know by looks and none of our chickens are named so the kill process goes off without too much sorrow, though the sight is slightly grim. We use kill cones (plastic gallon containers that have been nailed to a tree, the bottom of the container cut off and the neck of the container cut larger to fit the head through) which makes the killing process much calmer and less dramatic, seeing as there are no headless chickens flopping around the barnyard. Instead, the chickens are gently placed into the cones where they stay quiet, their wings pinned to their sides. Once they are calm, we give thanks for the bird, and quickly slit the artery in the neck without cutting the windpipe. Essentially, the chicken bleeds out and quietly ‘falls asleep' while the heart continues to pump the blood from their body – it's very gentle (as gentle as killing can be).

The men folk in our family usually take on this task, as I prefer to complete the other stages of the process. Scalding. Plucking. And gutting.

Here's a quick play-by-play of the process on how to butcher a chicken.


How To Butcher A Chicken

The first of many harvests took place this weekend, as it was time to send our beloved (or rather, tolerated) meat chickens to the freezer. It's never a day I look forward to – taking the life of an animal brings me no joy.

Well, scratch that. It does bring me joy in knowing that the Lord has provided these chickens for us and that He's made it possible for us to raise them, care for them, and end their lives as best as we can. But other than in the provision for our family, it's not the most fun task on the farm and (in my humble opinion) not one to be taken lightly.

To live and then die that others may live is sacrifice. These birds were sacrificed for our family and we are thankful for that.

There were too many to know by looks and none of our chickens are named so the kill process goes off without too much sorrow, though the sight is slightly grim. We use kill cones (plastic gallon containers that have been nailed to a tree, the bottom of the container cut off and the neck of the container cut larger to fit the head through) which makes the killing process much calmer and less dramatic, seeing as there are no headless chickens flopping around the barnyard. Instead, the chickens are gently placed into the cones where they stay quiet, their wings pinned to their sides. Once they are calm, we give thanks for the bird, and quickly slit the artery in the neck without cutting the windpipe. Essentially, the chicken bleeds out and quietly ‘falls asleep' while the heart continues to pump the blood from their body – it's very gentle (as gentle as killing can be).

The men folk in our family usually take on this task, as I prefer to complete the other stages of the process. Scalding. Plucking. And gutting.

Here's a quick play-by-play of the process on how to butcher a chicken.


How To Butcher A Chicken

The first of many harvests took place this weekend, as it was time to send our beloved (or rather, tolerated) meat chickens to the freezer. It's never a day I look forward to – taking the life of an animal brings me no joy.

Well, scratch that. It does bring me joy in knowing that the Lord has provided these chickens for us and that He's made it possible for us to raise them, care for them, and end their lives as best as we can. But other than in the provision for our family, it's not the most fun task on the farm and (in my humble opinion) not one to be taken lightly.

To live and then die that others may live is sacrifice. These birds were sacrificed for our family and we are thankful for that.

There were too many to know by looks and none of our chickens are named so the kill process goes off without too much sorrow, though the sight is slightly grim. We use kill cones (plastic gallon containers that have been nailed to a tree, the bottom of the container cut off and the neck of the container cut larger to fit the head through) which makes the killing process much calmer and less dramatic, seeing as there are no headless chickens flopping around the barnyard. Instead, the chickens are gently placed into the cones where they stay quiet, their wings pinned to their sides. Once they are calm, we give thanks for the bird, and quickly slit the artery in the neck without cutting the windpipe. Essentially, the chicken bleeds out and quietly ‘falls asleep' while the heart continues to pump the blood from their body – it's very gentle (as gentle as killing can be).

The men folk in our family usually take on this task, as I prefer to complete the other stages of the process. Scalding. Plucking. And gutting.

Here's a quick play-by-play of the process on how to butcher a chicken.


How To Butcher A Chicken

The first of many harvests took place this weekend, as it was time to send our beloved (or rather, tolerated) meat chickens to the freezer. It's never a day I look forward to – taking the life of an animal brings me no joy.

Well, scratch that. It does bring me joy in knowing that the Lord has provided these chickens for us and that He's made it possible for us to raise them, care for them, and end their lives as best as we can. But other than in the provision for our family, it's not the most fun task on the farm and (in my humble opinion) not one to be taken lightly.

To live and then die that others may live is sacrifice. These birds were sacrificed for our family and we are thankful for that.

There were too many to know by looks and none of our chickens are named so the kill process goes off without too much sorrow, though the sight is slightly grim. We use kill cones (plastic gallon containers that have been nailed to a tree, the bottom of the container cut off and the neck of the container cut larger to fit the head through) which makes the killing process much calmer and less dramatic, seeing as there are no headless chickens flopping around the barnyard. Instead, the chickens are gently placed into the cones where they stay quiet, their wings pinned to their sides. Once they are calm, we give thanks for the bird, and quickly slit the artery in the neck without cutting the windpipe. Essentially, the chicken bleeds out and quietly ‘falls asleep' while the heart continues to pump the blood from their body – it's very gentle (as gentle as killing can be).

The men folk in our family usually take on this task, as I prefer to complete the other stages of the process. Scalding. Plucking. And gutting.

Here's a quick play-by-play of the process on how to butcher a chicken.


How To Butcher A Chicken

The first of many harvests took place this weekend, as it was time to send our beloved (or rather, tolerated) meat chickens to the freezer. It's never a day I look forward to – taking the life of an animal brings me no joy.

Well, scratch that. It does bring me joy in knowing that the Lord has provided these chickens for us and that He's made it possible for us to raise them, care for them, and end their lives as best as we can. But other than in the provision for our family, it's not the most fun task on the farm and (in my humble opinion) not one to be taken lightly.

To live and then die that others may live is sacrifice. These birds were sacrificed for our family and we are thankful for that.

There were too many to know by looks and none of our chickens are named so the kill process goes off without too much sorrow, though the sight is slightly grim. We use kill cones (plastic gallon containers that have been nailed to a tree, the bottom of the container cut off and the neck of the container cut larger to fit the head through) which makes the killing process much calmer and less dramatic, seeing as there are no headless chickens flopping around the barnyard. Instead, the chickens are gently placed into the cones where they stay quiet, their wings pinned to their sides. Once they are calm, we give thanks for the bird, and quickly slit the artery in the neck without cutting the windpipe. Essentially, the chicken bleeds out and quietly ‘falls asleep' while the heart continues to pump the blood from their body – it's very gentle (as gentle as killing can be).

The men folk in our family usually take on this task, as I prefer to complete the other stages of the process. Scalding. Plucking. And gutting.

Here's a quick play-by-play of the process on how to butcher a chicken.


How To Butcher A Chicken

The first of many harvests took place this weekend, as it was time to send our beloved (or rather, tolerated) meat chickens to the freezer. It's never a day I look forward to – taking the life of an animal brings me no joy.

Well, scratch that. It does bring me joy in knowing that the Lord has provided these chickens for us and that He's made it possible for us to raise them, care for them, and end their lives as best as we can. But other than in the provision for our family, it's not the most fun task on the farm and (in my humble opinion) not one to be taken lightly.

To live and then die that others may live is sacrifice. These birds were sacrificed for our family and we are thankful for that.

There were too many to know by looks and none of our chickens are named so the kill process goes off without too much sorrow, though the sight is slightly grim. We use kill cones (plastic gallon containers that have been nailed to a tree, the bottom of the container cut off and the neck of the container cut larger to fit the head through) which makes the killing process much calmer and less dramatic, seeing as there are no headless chickens flopping around the barnyard. Instead, the chickens are gently placed into the cones where they stay quiet, their wings pinned to their sides. Once they are calm, we give thanks for the bird, and quickly slit the artery in the neck without cutting the windpipe. Essentially, the chicken bleeds out and quietly ‘falls asleep' while the heart continues to pump the blood from their body – it's very gentle (as gentle as killing can be).

The men folk in our family usually take on this task, as I prefer to complete the other stages of the process. Scalding. Plucking. And gutting.

Here's a quick play-by-play of the process on how to butcher a chicken.


How To Butcher A Chicken

The first of many harvests took place this weekend, as it was time to send our beloved (or rather, tolerated) meat chickens to the freezer. It's never a day I look forward to – taking the life of an animal brings me no joy.

Well, scratch that. It does bring me joy in knowing that the Lord has provided these chickens for us and that He's made it possible for us to raise them, care for them, and end their lives as best as we can. But other than in the provision for our family, it's not the most fun task on the farm and (in my humble opinion) not one to be taken lightly.

To live and then die that others may live is sacrifice. These birds were sacrificed for our family and we are thankful for that.

There were too many to know by looks and none of our chickens are named so the kill process goes off without too much sorrow, though the sight is slightly grim. We use kill cones (plastic gallon containers that have been nailed to a tree, the bottom of the container cut off and the neck of the container cut larger to fit the head through) which makes the killing process much calmer and less dramatic, seeing as there are no headless chickens flopping around the barnyard. Instead, the chickens are gently placed into the cones where they stay quiet, their wings pinned to their sides. Once they are calm, we give thanks for the bird, and quickly slit the artery in the neck without cutting the windpipe. Essentially, the chicken bleeds out and quietly ‘falls asleep' while the heart continues to pump the blood from their body – it's very gentle (as gentle as killing can be).

The men folk in our family usually take on this task, as I prefer to complete the other stages of the process. Scalding. Plucking. And gutting.

Here's a quick play-by-play of the process on how to butcher a chicken.


How To Butcher A Chicken

The first of many harvests took place this weekend, as it was time to send our beloved (or rather, tolerated) meat chickens to the freezer. It's never a day I look forward to – taking the life of an animal brings me no joy.

Well, scratch that. It does bring me joy in knowing that the Lord has provided these chickens for us and that He's made it possible for us to raise them, care for them, and end their lives as best as we can. But other than in the provision for our family, it's not the most fun task on the farm and (in my humble opinion) not one to be taken lightly.

To live and then die that others may live is sacrifice. These birds were sacrificed for our family and we are thankful for that.

There were too many to know by looks and none of our chickens are named so the kill process goes off without too much sorrow, though the sight is slightly grim. We use kill cones (plastic gallon containers that have been nailed to a tree, the bottom of the container cut off and the neck of the container cut larger to fit the head through) which makes the killing process much calmer and less dramatic, seeing as there are no headless chickens flopping around the barnyard. Instead, the chickens are gently placed into the cones where they stay quiet, their wings pinned to their sides. Once they are calm, we give thanks for the bird, and quickly slit the artery in the neck without cutting the windpipe. Essentially, the chicken bleeds out and quietly ‘falls asleep' while the heart continues to pump the blood from their body – it's very gentle (as gentle as killing can be).

The men folk in our family usually take on this task, as I prefer to complete the other stages of the process. Scalding. Plucking. And gutting.

Here's a quick play-by-play of the process on how to butcher a chicken.


How To Butcher A Chicken

The first of many harvests took place this weekend, as it was time to send our beloved (or rather, tolerated) meat chickens to the freezer. It's never a day I look forward to – taking the life of an animal brings me no joy.

Well, scratch that. It does bring me joy in knowing that the Lord has provided these chickens for us and that He's made it possible for us to raise them, care for them, and end their lives as best as we can. But other than in the provision for our family, it's not the most fun task on the farm and (in my humble opinion) not one to be taken lightly.

To live and then die that others may live is sacrifice. These birds were sacrificed for our family and we are thankful for that.

There were too many to know by looks and none of our chickens are named so the kill process goes off without too much sorrow, though the sight is slightly grim. We use kill cones (plastic gallon containers that have been nailed to a tree, the bottom of the container cut off and the neck of the container cut larger to fit the head through) which makes the killing process much calmer and less dramatic, seeing as there are no headless chickens flopping around the barnyard. Instead, the chickens are gently placed into the cones where they stay quiet, their wings pinned to their sides. Once they are calm, we give thanks for the bird, and quickly slit the artery in the neck without cutting the windpipe. Essentially, the chicken bleeds out and quietly ‘falls asleep' while the heart continues to pump the blood from their body – it's very gentle (as gentle as killing can be).

The men folk in our family usually take on this task, as I prefer to complete the other stages of the process. Scalding. Plucking. And gutting.

Here's a quick play-by-play of the process on how to butcher a chicken.



Comments:

  1. Sakima

    Very funny answer

  2. Tojataxe

    In all probability. Most likely.

  3. Nekinos

    I don't understand something

  4. Ady

    You have missed the most important.



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